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​RUSS  J. ALAN

THURSDAY, JULY 8, 2010

U.S. Department of Justice files lawsuit against the voters of Arizona


The U.S. Department of "Justice" failed to also name as defendents the voters of Arizona and the state legislators in their July 6th, 2010 complaint to the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona, when in actuality they are really suing the voters of Arizona and the Arizona state legislators (who were elected by the voters of Arizona) who followed the will of their constituents by passing the illegal immigration bill. 

The lawsuit names Gov. Jan Brewer as defendent -- but why? She merely signed the bill that the majority of Arizonans wanted. Who they really want to silence are the Conservative people of Arizona.

The federal government is suing a state, against the will of the people. Has the reality hit you yet?

Arizona's Governor Jan Brewer stands alone in the border war. 

There's no need to mention California. Don't expect New Mexico to follow suit either. One can imagine Arizona's illegal alien neighbors in New Mexico chugging cerveza like water and sweeping up enough margarita salt to chalk a ball field as they celebrate the strong 45-25 democrat majority in their House of Representatives under the leadership of democrat Governor and former Obama cabinet member Bill Richardson. This will not change any time soon -- New Mexico will not be holding state legislature elections in 2010.

Meanwhile in the rest of the nation, Conservatives proudly Remember The Alamo and recite the Texas constitution's right to secede provision and envision Texas as a Conservative rock and safe haven for possible future relocation. Unfortunately, even though the Texas House of Representatives has a slight Republican majority -- 79 Republicans versus 71 democrats -- the possibility of a Texas illegal alien bill similar to Arizona's is pretty much out of the question. Even if they were to somehow pass one and the Republicans in the Texas State Senate, who outnumber the democrats 20-11, passed the bill, would Texas Governor Rick Perry sign it into law? Governor Perry has already said, "I fully recognize and support a state's right and obligation to protect its citizens, but I have concerns with portions of the law passed in Arizona and believe it would not be the right direction for Texas..." 

Unlike New Mexico -- California and Texas will have state legislative election in November 2010. Governor Rick Perry was the winner of the recent Texas Republican primary election and most likely will be re-elected over democrat primary winner, Houston Mayor Bill White. Texas Conservatives have a chance, if they will get out to the polls, to put a larger majority of Conservatives in the seats of their House of Representatives. If this is the case, Texans who like Arizona's new immigration law may have another chance at getting one for their state in 2011.

Everybody is talking about Arizona's Governor Jan Brewer and her illegal immigration law. Conservatives are in awe. Facebook has been "a-twitter" with her picture, her supporters' comments, etc.; however, a valuable lesson can be learned from the REAL heroes -- the Conservative voters of the State of Arizona. How did they do it? They immersed themselves in local politics in their state and made it a priority to be at the polls in their last state legislative election. The result: they elected a 60% Conservative majority for their state House of Representatives, and that was the true beginning of Arizona's tough immigration law. 

All but 6 states -- Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, New Mexico, and Virginia -- will have their state legislative elections in November 2010. If Conservatives are to succeed with issues such as illegal immigration or state sovereignty under the 10th Amendment over issues such as government health care, we must have a wide Conservative majority in our State Houses, and in order to obtain that majority, we must make it a top priority to get to the polls and vote in our state elections. We must immerse ourselves in local politics.